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of threat to the united states. both got hit by a big disaster, and i think both responded very, very positively. i think -- i don't disagree with a single thing the president said that he was doing better. in the future, when someone like this guy's father comes into an embassy, we won't just make a little note about it, we're going to pull his visa and see to it that he doesn't get on an airplane. but i think there are a couple of things that the president didn't say that i wish he had talked about. we now know that these terrorists are almost all young male muslims from about a dozen countries. it seems to me that we ought to at least begin a certain degree of profiling. and say that every such person gets special kinds of screening before they get on a plane coming to the united states when they are not citizens of the united states itself. that's number one. and number two, he didn't change his view on whether or not someone like this guy should be charged in a criminal court and given fifth amendment rights. i'm convinced that he should first be treated as an enemy combatant and
and united states are going to continue to cooperate so as to be more effective in preventing radical islamic terrorism and prosecuting it when it arises. we shared information with secretary napolitano. and in due course, people spoke and your contributed to that debate. we also came up with an joint statement. it's a eu-u.s. statement. it's an important resolution. it's based on aviation security in particular. and you'll get that text at the end of this press conference. we mention a number of points that are dear to us all. we're talking here about the risk of terrorists, basically the same risk on both sides of the -- i think we want to protect our principals and values. our way of life. and those attacks of course by terrorism. we also share -- say that we share responsibility for fighting terrorism to ensure safety and security for our citizens. i think we all share many of these international values. we talk about a number of objectives and measures. objectives have a lot to do with aviation security. if we've learned anything from the spoiled attack over detroit is that flighted stil
in the united states had to be ground and because of money and power and they always say van dare was like family to bush. we're dealing with these leaders that making deals back home deals with people and then all of the sudden they come back you know and roost here and then you wonder why we're being attacked. we're spending our own money to give this money to these people for energy to come back and kill us with our own money. when we going to wake up? you know? it's like we're being directed in one way and then when we make deals with these people they're suppose to be the good guy and look what happens. host: thanks for the call. "washington post" says al qaeda benefits for decades worth of miss stepped in yemen. first of all u.s. commandos are trained encounter tactics. many say the war could arrive too late to change the trajectory in yemen. since the u.s.s coal attacked the nation has been past toward the illusion that the government is weak to control swats in the country. it's stretched thin and separatist movement in the south. it's got high employment unemployment rate and al
been this delay. >> the former president of the united states, bill clinton, take it, has been spending time with the president today at the white house. what do weigh know about this? >> you know, it is interesting because we saw him come here to the white house to have a meeting with the president. we asked about that when we saw him arrive here. we were told that he came and was simply in town. and came here to stop by and meet with the president and also meet with other officials here at the white house. we don't know if he's still here. . beyond that we don't know anything else about that meeting. it does seem interesting the timing of this while this is all taking place, the former president, bill clinton did come by the white house. >> stand by. we will be getting back to you. once again, we are awaiting the president. he's supposed to come out around 4:30 p.m. eastern, 27 minutes or so from now. let's bring in our -- our panel, national security contributor, fran townsend, former homeland security adviser to president bush. also with us, national security analyst peter bergen. s
on the united states, for sure we should have cancelled his visa instead of saying, well, we'll look at his visa again after it's expired. because the results of that was 300 people on the plane almost expired. so this is a very big wake-up call. and the first place we should wake up is to toss out the views of the so-called privacy advocates who have been hangin' around the fringes of this question for the last five years, a body scan with the technology today doesn't invade anybody's privacy. you can't tell whether it's a man or a woman. >> but yet it's these privacy groups, governor, that still make a big deal of it. we're just getting word that the minneapolis airport. more on that. we'll let you know but it's on the heels of this disruption in newark a couple days ago. but what keeps happening here? >> the congress needs to stand up to these folks and say, hey, mandatory patdowns are a bigger invasion of privacy than the body scan. i would hope that the president of the united states tells people today that there will be mandatory body scans on every domestic polite in the united states and
to strike the united states and were recruiting operatives to do so. the intelligence community did not aggressively follow up and prioritize streams of information related to a possible attack against the homeland. second, this contributed to a larger failure analysis, a failure to connect the dots of intelligence that existed across our intelligence community and which together could have revealed that abdul mutallab was planning an attack. third, this in turn fed into shortcomings in the watch listing system which resulted in this person not being placed on the no-fly list, thereby, allowing him to board that plane in amsterdam for detroit. in summary, the u.s. government had the information scattered throughout the system to potentially on the cover this plot and disrupt the attack rather than of failure to collect or share intelligence, this was a failure to connect and understand the intelligence that we already had. and that is why we took swift action in the days following christmas, including updating the terrorist watch list system and adding more individuals to the no-fly
barrier, for these issues. in the united states we have the high-paying jobs here in the united states. host: how can this be done? caller: i am not certain about how you can do this. it seems that corporate america would rather pay the lower costs, then keeping the labor here in the united states. the government may be able to find a way to keep these jobs here in the united states. host: thank you very much. the "richmond times dispatch." they have a report on the comeback of the stock market, and how the seemed unimaginable. that is one take on the economy. baltimore, you are up right now. how are you doing? caller: i would say the number one policy issue for me is afghanistan. and there is the economy and jobs. i have done quite a bit of reading. this is reminding me of vietnam. i think that this is taking so many resources from the country and it will be hard to address any other problem. we are approaching this in the middle east, and this is not helping to solve the problems over there. more money should be devoted to domestic problems. i would like to see a lot done with public
focus by the united states on the problems of terrorism and in giving assistance to the government of yemen and following 2003 when there was a sense that al qaeda had been defeat indeed yemen, much of that dropped off. the amount 06 attention, the amount of resources that we gave to yemen dropped off significantly. and since 2006, with the reconstitution of al qaeda in yemen, only platedly has the united states sort of focused again on the problem there and of course the reason why we're talking about it this morning is because omar farooq aomar that took took omar farooq kathwari was coming from yemen. caller: my question is how long have we been with this war against yemen? i mean, i don't mean to go to a conspiracy theory but i read in ha general petraeus and another went down there so when tough head of arms services committee go to yemen, they are not just going to see if it's -- >> well, i wouldn't characterize it at all as a war in yemen. and senator mccain is my former boss. i worked for him for 5 1/2 years on foreign policy and so i can state categorically what was on his
there is not dissimilar from the screening in the united states, and the screening that abdulmutallab went through was not that dissimilar. we want more explosive detection, more technology. other airports have resisted some of those items, because of other concerns that they have about privacy, for example. this incident is serving as a catalyst to reopen that dialogue, particularly with the airports and countries where we have a large throughput of passengers to the united states. >> i want to get back to that. i assume that there will be another round of questioning. i was shipped off of this to something else why have you here. we all know what has happened in haiti over the last seven to 10 days, it has been devastating. there is an issue about adoption potential, haiti children who had been left without parents. we have about five families here who have completed paperwork to get the children from haiti. and yet they are being held up. i need to get a commitment from you that the citizenship and immigration services will work with my office to help expedite our ability to get those kids out.
the ambassador from haiti to the united states, that more than 100,000 are feared dead or missing as a result of this earthquake that rocked haiti almost 24 hours ago. more than 100,000 people. we heard the same thing from the prime minister of haiti just a few hours ago. susan candiotti is now on the scene for us. just a little while ago filed this report. >> reporter: over my shoulder you will see some of the thousands of homes that are built into the side of the mountains here. these ones you see over my shoulder incredibly were not impacted by the earthquake, but as we flew from the dominican republic into port-au-prince, we began to see right away some of the devastation caused by this earthquake. we saw, for one thing, a lot of homes that were employeded, looked as though they had been imploded. then when we finally set down or helicopter at the airport here, we saw cracks in the airport, we saw people teeming outside, lined up, but patiently, without causing problem, waiting to see if they could get a commercial flight out. there was no way that was going to happen, but the real impact
requirements for individuals lying to the united states. every individual applying to the united states from anywhere in the world who has an itinerary are passed for from nations that are sponsors of terrorism or countries of interest are in charge go through -- are required to go through enhanced screening. others will go through random threat based enhanced screening. at airports throughout the u.s. we have airport law enforcement officials and security measures but seen and unseen. i want to express our thanks for the traveling public for their patience with the increased security measures. i want to thank the department of homeland security personnel who have been engaged on a day- to-day basis to implement them since christmas. today i would like to describe to you five of the recommendations that are included in our report to the president. first, there needs to be an evaluation and modification of the criteria and process used to create the terrorist watch list. this will involve the border, and security and other members of the intelligence community. the effort will include evaluat
that a nigerian was being prepared for attacks in the united states on the homeland. my understanding is the least one of those intersects i think there were several specifically mentioned umar farouk abdulmutallab, the first two names. if you put it together with the fact this suspect's own father and not just anyone off the street as it has been stated by some in the intelligence community but a respected nigerian banker went physically to the embassy and talked to not one agency but to, the department and central intelligence agency and wasn't in missing person report. he said he was conservative his son, he's in yemen, and the nsa intercepted background. follow those meetings with written communications and telephone calls. we know that yemen is a hotbed of terrorism. apparently intelligence community didn't receive a possibility al qaeda and the arab peninsula might attack the homeland which is the story is another failure of imagination and it seems al qaeda is fixation on aviation system all of it seems to me not just in retrospect but before the effect of to have been enough to put on high
him into the united states and britain. so this is the kind of threat where it's maybe an individual now rather than in one particular cell that al qaeda can utilize in this type of aircraft attack. >> there's still a lot of unfinished work today-to-do for the obama administration in reforming the way intelligence is shared inside the u.s. bureaucracy for looking at the problem of signal to noise in the system, wrefb information is shared, how do you distinguish reliable and important information from false reporting and misleading reporting. there's... anyone who works in the system who deals with threat reporting testifies that there is an enormous amount of noise in the system. and even if you share the noise, that doesn't actually create the clarity you need to act against real threats. >> yemen is a country's in great chaos at the moment. there's a civil war in the north draining off a lot of military resources at the moment. there's a separate insurgency which is increasingly violent in the south. the government is running out of money as it loses oil exports and so i think wha
into this al qaeda narrative that says that islam -- the united states is at war with islam. we have to be very careful. it's that narrative that feeds the ranks and builds the ranks of al qaeda. >> reporter: this afternoon, the council on american/islamic relations said the new guidelines amount to racial profiling, though the tsa says the majority of all travelers come to the u.s. will get enhanced screening, not just those from the 14 countries named. wolf? >> do you get the sense this is just the latest step that more are on the way? >> this is definitely an evolutionary process. they want to take some steps immediately. there will be reevaluations, new intelligence that come in, and things will change, i'm sure. >> thank you, jeanne. >>> let's get to the white house where the terror threat is the president's most urgent priority. he's back from vacation. our dan lothian is standing by. dan, the president is getting some high-level briefings today, getting ready for a full-scale meeting with his top advisers tomorrow? >> reporter: he is, wolf. first of all, the president getting an update f
-terror strategy. am i wrong? >> i think it's deeper than that. the united states has a problem. if this was a political matter, then you could have one level of concern. but the fact is that we are in a war, our enemies are clever enough to take haggai nearian, train him in yemen, ship him through amsterdam. our bureaucracy is so lacking in focus that even when this guy's father called the american embassy and warned us specifically about his son, we couldn't find a way to stop him and frankly issue the white house advisor yesterday made no sense when he said there was no smoking gun. we don't have to approve the visa or the flight of every foreigner who wants to come here. the burden of proof ought to be on that person. if somebody's father calls and says, my son has gone radical. i think he may be in a training camp. i think that ought to be a high hurdle for that person to get a visa to the united states or be allowed to fly into this country. >> you know the bureaucracy is always going to screw up. it's just never going to be entirely perfect. and this flight emanating in t
. >>> the president of the united states getting ready to address the nation from the white house. as soon as he goes to the microphone, you'll hear what he has to say on the failed terror attack in detroit, outside detroit on christmas day. we'll go there live, you'll hear everything. in the meantime, let's check in with jack cafferty. he has today's "cafferty file." >> some say it's past time to begin profiling passengers. the u.s. is demanding better koreaning from places like iran, pakistan, saudi arabia, yemen, the usual suspects. the screening is to include things like full body scans, patdowns, searches of carry-on bags, and explosive detection technology. from the school of common sense comes the idea it makes sense to more thoroughly screen passengers who come from cunning where they may have been exposed to radical islamic teaching, but improved technology isn't the answer. the head of security for el al, says we need better questioning of passengers. he suggests hiring well-educated, highly trained agents, who know what to look for. he says profiling isn't about single out certain ethnic g
back to them, plus interest. and one caller stated earlier, the banking system of the united states should be a national or federalized system where the people, through government, issues credit to whoever needs it. that way the money stays within the system instead of going through the pockets of private bankers. so it's really a moot point whether he should be replaced or not. it's who's going run the mafia. it doesn't matter. it's still the mafia that's sucking the wealth out of our nation. host: off twitter, someone who identifies himself as c.p., says bernanke is just being scapegoated for congress' mistakes, washington politics as usual, all form and no substance. largo, florida, independent line. frank, go ahead. caller: good morning. i'll have to second the previous caller's assertions there. hl-1207 has 300 sponsors in the house, and s-604, bills to audit the fed, has over 30 cosponsors in the senate. and we need to call our senators to get this audit of the federal reserve. after that, it will be very easy to establish a grand jury, which will have subpoena power and indic
-- the world's leading communication nation, the united states, has been at least until recently outcommunicated by mass murdered living in the most remote areas of afghanistan and pakistan. and we have to take the public information space back from the enemy in order to succeed. and ashley is pioneered such creative ideas as using cell phone technology and such obviously ideas as countering their abuse of low wattage fm station to say terrible lies. next to her, is valley nee 15. he came to us from and has just written another one of the wonderful books. he was working on pakistan for us and not on iran, since that always appeared in the blogs inaccurately. i think we are missing someone. tim who came to us from afghanistan. a representing the future of the foreign service. we have a whole lot of other people in the back there, including in the department, from nine other agent sis plus the state department. strobe, what i'd like to say, the most common question i get in when i walk down the street or run into people is the most valid. why are we in afghanistan? that's a fair qu
-span is a person under the law of the united states and constitutional holding. here is why -- if the fcc and fbi were to blow through these doors right now and turn off all the cameras and a subpoena your files, it would be c-span -- it cannot vote, it is not a citizen, and yet everyone would recognize that that is a fundamental violation of the rights of c-span. why? because at the end of the day, c-span, just like any other association of individuals, it is an association of the people that make up the entity. this is very important. we cannot skip past the idea that associations of individuals have their rights and keep it short shrift. have to be respected in a democratic republic. with regard to george sorus, campaign finance law requires them to spend independently all he wants, but the sec investigated import i believe two years for a book -- the fcc investigated him out for i believe two years for a book he wrote about george bush. if we are deciding if a book should be banned or if books are illegal or if books are not part of our debate, whether by george soros or any other individual,
on christmas day. we have 40 machines throughout the united states and in 2010 we will deploy 300 more of them. we may deploy more than that. >> enhanced security is one part of the answer but changes will have to be made with how the u.s. handles their intelligence. >> americans have grown used to the idea that the battle against al qaeda and the associates are taking place overseas. but what happened in this aiort was a reminder that as far as the enemy is concerned, america is also the frontline. this has raised difficult questions about how to battle this threat. >> the security agencies have now completed a review into what went wrong. > at this stage in the process it appears that this was not the fault of a single individual or organization, but a systemic failure across the different organizations and agencies. >> he was on the watch list and even his father had warned the officials that the sun was becoming more radical. today he will be driven through this note to this court room. some of those who were on the flight will also be there, to look at the man accused of trying to bring d
cooperation between intelligence, homeland security, law enforcement, both here within the united states and throughout the world. notwithstanding, these remarkable achievements over the seven years after the enactment of the department of homeland security and some of the extraordinary defenses which occurred in 2009, the record also shows that in 2009, three islamic terrorists broke through our defenses, a man who murdered an army recruiter and little rock, ark. simply because he was wearing the uniform of the u.s. army. the doll house on who murdered 13 americans -- nidal hasan who killed 13 people in fort hood and abdulmutallab. there are clearly some things about our homeland defenses that are not working as we need them to. we need to find out together what is to win on and why and fix it. i know it is probably not realistic to promise the i feel very strongly that that must be our goal. it is the standard that will guide our committee in this inquiry and the other we are conducting on the terrorist attack at fort hood. any recommendations that we make as a result of our inquiry.
. >>> and united states and great britain closing their embassies in yemen, citing a specific, credible ongoing threat from al qaeda. it's unclear how long the embassies will remain closed. is yemen the new front in the war on terror? we're live in dubai with our security watch this morning. >>> we begin with tough new security measures facing every passenger flying to america from 14 high-risk nations, those nations are considered sponsors of terrorism or countries of interest by the transportation security administration. the new rules take effect this morning. our homeland security correspondent jean mene meserve live. >> reporter: all passengers on flights heading into the united states will be subject to random screening, and those flying in from certain countries will be required to go through enhanced screenings, such as full-body pat-downs, carry on bag searches, full body scanning and explosive detection swabs, this according to a new security directive issued by the transportation security administration, and now in effect. the countries include those that are officially listed by the
an executive order granting interpol and certain rights and immunities here in the united states. some are wondering if that has caused an opening for interpol to have extraordinary police powers in the united states. a requested it? -- who requested it? >> the executive order updated interpol's status based on the fact that within the fast five years -- past five years they have opened an office to assist in the type of information sharing between governments that we all know that is so important. all that does is simply bring them and given the same privileges and responsibilities that many other international organizations have in this country like the iea, imf, the red cross. >> it does not give them police powers? >> absolutely not. >> can you tell me whether any questions that took place here at the white house questions whether or not he would be tried as an enemy combatant? >> whether the conversations took place here at the white house? >> whether the 23-year-old should be tried as an enemy combatant. >> i would say a lot of subjects were covered in the situation room in terms
a visa to the united states. >> okay. >> or be allowed to fly into the country. >> you know bureaucracy is always going to screw up. it's never going to be person. this flight in the negligenter lands and the way they do things is different than the way we do things. now, this overreaction. they're padding down everybody chbl the question is in your opinion, are we safe? i mean, are these people going to be able to get through the shield and has the obama administration weakened our defenses against al qaeda? >> we're not safe. we're in much greater danger than a year ago. it's not just bush versus obama. north koreans had an additional year to build nuclear weapons and missles. iranians had a year to develop nuclear weapons and to keep paying for terrorists. al qaeda had an additional year and two of the top four people in al qaeda in yemen were released from guantanamo bay. obama administration continues to release terrorists back into the world. >> bush did that. bush released those two guys. >> then, he was wrong and the state department was wrong and initial releases. we now have p
not on the no-fly list. >>> new rules went into effect for travelers flying to the united states from overseas. all passengers from or traveling through 14 countries considered high-risk are to receive full body patdowns and have their carry-on luggage opened and inspected. let's bring in tom costello. the new rules took into effect today. you were detailing how intense the security was, even yourself patted down head to toe. >> i was coming in from brussels, not on the list of countries that are considered high-risk. but nonetheless, perhaps an indication of what you can expect if you're traveling from one of those countries or even with enhanced security in europe. they did a patdown from my shoulder to my toes and around my waist. they had my open up my belt. the officer literally took his hands and felt inside my jeans around my waist, only my waist, but checking to see if i was wearing anything there. once we were on the flight the captain turned off the map about halfway across the atlantic ocean and 25 minutes or so before landing, all seat belts were secured and nobody was allowed to g
in the united states saying he's not guilty. this hour the dramatic scene inside the courtroom as he entered his plea and what comes next. >>> some muslim women say they're being stopped, searchened and even beating an airports sincely because they're wearing head scarves. is it part of the government's official policy? what's going on? >>> the republican national commit aye chairman under fire by members of his own party. they say michael steele needs to muzzle himself. >>> i'm wolf blitzer, you're in "the situation room." >>> his mug shot has been plastered all over the air waves and internet for weeks. today reporters got a better look at umar farouk abdulmutallab, the man charged with transcribing to blow up a u.s. airliner on christmas. our deborah feyerick was inside the courtroom when he entered the plea. she's joining us live from droimt. describe, deb, what happened. >> reporter: wolf, abdulmutallab walked in very, remember he's suffering lap burns have been detonated the bomb that was hidden in his underwear. he was wearing a white t-shirt and khaki pants, sneakers, his feet were shack
, counterterrorism officials on the ground in the united states were alerted to the name abdulmutallab on that flight manifest and they were going to question him when he landed at detroit. well, if his name was there, and it alerted them to the point that they were going to actually drag him aside and question him, why in fact was he then permitted to get on the plane in the first place. it was said he wasn't on the no-fly list. then why would those authorities want to question him when he landed in the u.s. it will be interesting to hear what the president has to say about that today. >> and jim, that very point suggests that there's an issue as far as, yes, trying to track people in the united states. they want to ask them questions when they meet with customs agents and whatnot once they land. it was almost as if they thought, well, that might be the problem, not that he might actually try to be a problem while he's trying to get here. >> reporter: that's right. one of the questions that intel people are asking is, if they thought that -- if he was a person of concern, wouldn't they think there s
people flying into the united states will face tough new security measures. the tsa saying enhanced screening will focus on people flying through countries of interest such as yemen, pakistan and nigeria. the enhanced techniques include full-body patdowns, body scans and thorough searches of carry-on luggage. >>> 2010, as we were saying, good morning to you earlier, it has turned out already fairly deadly for the united states and its allies in afghanistan. nato saying four u.s. service members died in a roadside bomb yesterday. a british soldier was killed in a separate explosion. last year was the bloodiest for coalition forces since the war in afghanistan started. 514 service members died. united states has started deploying 30,000 more troops to fight the taliban. >>> look at this image that we found hanging off a building in former president jimmy carter's hometown of plains, georgia. witnesses told affiliate walb it's an effigy of president obama with a rope around its neck. and one person says it had a sign with the president's name on it. the secret service is now investigat
.s. passport. >> yes. >> reporter: and you've made this trip between the united states and nigeria many, many times? >> yes. about 20 times. >> reporter: really. dating back how far? >> 1995. >> reporter: this is emmanuel's boarding pass from the flight on christmas day, flight 253. >> as the pilot announced the descent into the detroit area, this sound. >> reporter: five rose directly in front of him an explosive device ignites. >> people started screaming, oh, there's smoke, there's smoke. >> reporter: the plane lands and what goes through your mind. >> i just expressed to god thank you for my life. >> reporter: alive, but soon under scrutiny. his name and travel records flash red flags to government officials on the ground. cnn learned emmanuel was tracked in a massive database called taks. >> they were picking some people at random for questioning. >> reporter: did they ever say that you were part of a government database that tracks people when they fly? >> not at all, not at all. >> reporter: the government database houses everything from immigration violations and criminal records to w
or asia to the united states, of course that should raise suspicions. but going after women with head scarves is ineffective. >> abernethy: so are you saying that you and other muslim leaders come down more on the side of individual freedom that you do on secuty? >> no, i think we have to have both. if you are going to stigmatize or isolate a population, that feeds into radicalization. part of the radicalization problem is when a community feels isolated, and when one person... and we're talking about now the concern over lone wolves or lone recruits, if that person feels desperate, depressed, then he becomes prey for extremist recruiters, and we should do anything and everything to help accelerate integration of muslims into american society. >> abernethy: after the christmas day near-disaster in the air near detroit, and some other recent events, too, do you sense a growing backlash against muslims in this country? >> there's a rise of the mob mentality. you read the comments on a number of stories, you get the emails, you get the phone calls. and i fee unfortunately, that the level
, but it needs to change in the entire united states as well. remember reverend right? he tried to explain this to america. republicans, you know what i was always taught? you call people liars, but i was always taught that it takes one to no one. go to your church and talked your creatures, who are not giving you the right training as far as how you should be as a person in america. thank you. host: news from the associated press, "bill gates is planning to give $10 billion to research vaccines over the next decade. also, there is a report that a osama bin laden, in a new video -- audio tape, has called for the world to abandon the u.s. dollar, blaming industrialized companies -- countries for global warming. the numbers are out for how many unions watched the state of the union, slipping down from last year. 48 million people tune in across 11 networks, but viewership is down from his address to the joint session of congress last february. the numbers are up from the first official address by george w. bush after the 9/11 terrorist attack. -- "as latter-day state of the union addresses g
the world, in britain and the united states as well. jon. jon: these reports of prisoners getting out of gitmo and going back to yemen to fight, what can you tell us about that? >> well, on very many levels, it's concerning. it's concerning, as i said, for nearby saudi arabia, because some of the gitmo detainees have been released , have gotten into yemen, and then they may be released to saudi arabia, gone into yemen and gone back to saudi, one tried to detonate an explosive device right next to one of the saudi princes recently, but we are hearing about a dozen of the former guantanamo detainees are actively involved now, at a rather high level, in this al-qaeda -- in al-qaeda in the arabian peninsula, the affiliate the based in yemen. we also are hearing reports of a high recidivism rate, 14 percent from those released from guantanamo get back into terrorism in some way and the biggest concern is what's due for the 91 yemenis released from guantanamo bay, what will become of them, what should become of them, so it's a pretty massive concern and neighboring somalia, the group al-sha
-- mourning, and they are grieving for their son, now in detention in the united states. they are grieving for what he attempted to do -. but, in fact, the alleged bomber's father, seen here, did take serious steps to try to rein in his son, who he thought was being radicalized during a state in yemen. a nigean intelligence agency and the american embassy in nigeria was told by yemen about his concerns. surprisingly, neither seems to have taken his warnings seriously enough. the vast majority of well- meaning nigerians will be appalled, but under the new regulations, and their country comes under the same category as a failed state, such as somalia. there are some doing entirely legitimate business with the united states and the rest of the world, but welmeaning nigerians also note that the man who attempted to blow up that claim held and nigerian passport. there is a reaction to the united states. >> we feel that we do not deserve that. it is not representative of 115 million nigerians. he was not trained in nigeria. it was outside of this country. generally, nigerians do not have terrori
on the national mall where the president of the united states, of course, would be taking the oath of office on january 20th and addressing the world with his inaugural address. they took it quite seriously in the last 48 to 72 hours before the inauguration. increasingly they were picking up signs that made them feel like this was a serious and possible threat. they met repeatedly with each other. old team, the bush team, the new team, the obama team, during this transition period in order to figure out what to do about it. it was a moment of quiet tension there for a new president who was just about to take office. >> i understand president obama canceled a rehearsal of the inauguration. when was the president actually briefed? do you know what his reaction was. >> caller: he was kept up to date in the few days leading up to the inauguration. there was one moment in particular we write about in the magazine, the night before the inauguration, his counterterrorism adviser john brennan and a couple foreign policy advisers jump into the limousine with him as he's heading off to an inaugural ev
flying into the united states. that announcement comes amid reports that the u.s. and brin have both shut down their embassies in yemen because of a newly revealed al qaeda threat. brian mooar with that story tonight from capitol hill. >> reporter: beginning at midnight, passengers threeing into the united states from other -- flying into the united states from other country also face tougher random screenings incling fum body scans. travelers from seven high-risk countries including nigeria and yemen, will get full-body pat downs and hands on luggage inspection, the latest fallout from the christmas day bombing a tempt on northwest flight 253, a plot allegedly hatched by al qaeda. >> part of something larger from al qaeda. >> on the sunday talk shows, white house counterterrorism adviser, john brennan add knitted the nation's intelligence agency had but failed to connect the series of dots and insists that the system isn't broken. >> there was no smoking gun or piece of intelligence that said this guy is a terrorist. >> we might have had a partial name or an indication of a nigeria but n
right now with all vessels from port to port of the united states, they submit a 96 hour notice of arrival and we do security checks and go through documentation and sometimes with physical boarding teams on the vessel. with liquidfied natural gas we do board the vessel and ensure that the documentation is in order and make sure that the people that are on the ship are supposed to be there. >> first, the latest into the investigation linking the failed bomber to al-qaeda. molly hennen berg has the details. >> president obama says yemen where 23-year-old umar farouk abdulmutallab prepped for his christmas day terrorist mission is a country "grappling with crushing poverty and deadly insurgency." yemen has sent hundreds of troops to two eastern provinces in the country where the government has little control to try to root out terrorists operating there. president obama says al-qaeda in yemen and the broader arabian peninsula attacked previously. >> they bombed yemeni facilities and western hotels. restaurants and embassies, including our embassy in 2008, killing one american. i m
back and forth. and exports from the united states has increased quite a bit. this year and one month we had sort of a setback. that is common because the numbers are released you a lot by borrowing. they shipped and plans one month and won the next, and that can make a big difference in the trade figures for that one month. it is a general trend, exports are rising pretty strongly. that is pretty good news for the american worker because it means maybe we are becoming more competitive and maybe we can sell more things. >> host: to job creation. carol, republican. good morning. >> caller: yes. i have a question in regards to the health care affects on new job creation and what it will do to the job economy. one of the questions i have, their is a lot of corruption in the city of chicago, and a lot of the newspapers. husband has been in jail for a couple years. while he was in jail for embezzlement and corruption he wrote the book that is the foundation of health care. is that the same? thank you. >> guest: to that health care. make the broader connection. it is really rough. a lot of
to the united states and the obama administration argues by keeping it open it's not only a propaganda tool but a tool that al-qaeda and its various allyies -- although is used to encourage attacks on the united states like the kind on christmas day. the united states says it's committed to closing guantanamo but the timeline is more extended than the president originally hoped. he originally set a january 10 meeting, as the deadline but it's clear it will not be closed before 2011 at the earlier. jon: i know the administration doesn't like the phrase war on terror but if there is a war on terror going on, yemen seems to be the new front, is that right? >> it is a newer front, as far as public perception. the administration would argue it has been focused on yemen since it arrived here, as was the bush administration to a certain degree. david petraeus, head of central command, was on yemen on saturday, john brennan told chris wallace he had been twice this year and yes, the administration is trying to beef up its counterterrorism to the yemeni government. one concession, if the united stat
in making the decides united states and in fact the world safer. >> guest: the president since he came to office has been trying to sound that theme. he traveled overseas, trying to, at least, at least make, make the words that come out of the president be about more cooperation and so on. and i think he is going to try to incorporate this theme, which is, you know, the concern about terrorism and, perhaps something that, has been gone into the background, under his presidency, until now. he is going to try to merge those two things and you will probably hear him talk about cooperation overseas to help make everybody safe. >> host: let's go to the phones. our first call comes from jacksonville, florida. william on our line for independents. good morning. >> caller: good morning, sir. good to see you. i like you. you're pretty informative. hello? >> host: go ahead, william. >> caller: yes, sir. how do we fight an enemy that don't wear no uniform, number one, the terrorists? that is the crazy thing i ever see. can nobody speak the language over there? can nobody go to yemen or afghanista
. >> as of now, all passengers on flights headed into the united states will be subject to random screening, not the intensive screening that's been in place since christmas day. those flying from certain countries or with passports from those countries will be required to go through enhanced screening that could include full body pat-downs, scanning and explosive detection swabs. this according to a new directive and now in effect. the countries include those that are listed by the state department as sponsoring terrorism -- cuba, iran, sudan and syria. the other countries were chosen because of concerns particularly about al qaeda affiliates. they are afghanistan, algeria, iraq, lebanon, libya, nigeria, pakistan and yemen. pilots on in-bound flights can prevent passengers from keeping pillows and blankets in their laps and to limit movement in the cabin. the president's top counter terrorism adviser fanned out across the talk shows sunday to say though there were lapses in sharing intelligence prior to attempted christmas attack there is no smoking gun. he rejected comparisons to the fail
created by the workers and laborers. my name is ray and i will attempt to run for united states congress in georgia. host: what district? caller: well, it will be statewide. in 1994 i ran in the first district. host: "the wall street journal ," it back to the lead article. morristown, new jersey, the republican line. caller: my wife worked in wall street for years. one of the things i find very interesting about -- everybody's basic comments about the bonuses is, while the ceo's may make a fair amount of money in bonuses and compensation, the reality is that the common people who work for these companies do not make this kind of money and as one of the previous callers indicated, it tends to be you rely on your bonus in order to get you through the year. we've made very little money back then and when you live in a metropolitan area like new york or even washington on los angeles, every little bit makes a big difference. people ae not making huge amounts of money. just enough basically to pay the bills and get by. you get to the center of the country, where a lot of irate people are cal
ask them how much, exactly, of this to you deserve by virtue of being a banker in the united states? even though you have been saved by the federal government. our sec person just call in all of our tax dollars. we are honest, government of biting folks for whom taxes are regulated, the banks were bailed out, saving these people, the bankers, their jobs, and etc.. now i want to ask them how do you explain tehe math? how is that benefiting? how is that fair? host: some of the names that we will hear from -- here is the photo from the paper -- "banks testifying before the committee last february, today they will hear from lloyd blank ein, jamie diamon, brian moynihan. leaders in congress said that they were not interested in debating the bankers. their purpose was to get information and it was more important than shaming anyone. for the chief executive at jpmorgan chase, the chief executive at goldman sachs, bank of america, and morgan stanley, that is good news as they prepare for their 9:00 a.m. appearance." john, what would you ask the bankers today? caller: probably 20 different q
has and most importantly visas that will get him into the united states and britain. so this is t kind of teat wher it's maybe an individual now rather than in o particular ll thatl qaeda can ulize in thi type of aircra attack. there's still a lot of unfinished wk today-to-do for the obamadministration in reforming the way intelligence is sharednside the u.s. bureaucracy for looki at the probleof signal to noise in the system wrefb information is shared, how d youistinguish reliable and important information from fals reporting andisleading reporting. the's... anyone who works in thsystem who dea with thre reporting testifies that there is an enormous amount of noise in the system. d even if you share the noise, that doesn't actuallyreate the clarity you need to actgainst real threats. >> yemen is a country's in gat chaos at theoment. there's a civil war in thenorth draining off a lot of litary resources at thmoment. there's aeparate inrgency which is increasiny violent in the soh. the governnt is running out of money it loses oil exports and so ithink what the u.s. needs to do is rea
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